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Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium
Winnerwell Nomad - Medium

Winnerwell Nomad - Medium

$349.00

With its rectangular firebox and nesting 4-leg design, the Winnerwell Nomad Medium Wood Burning Tent Stove quickly deploys to heat small spaces and easily stows away when not in use. Made with quality 304 stainless steel, the Nomad is an excellent heating and cooking solution in compatible canvas tents like our Classic Jack 140, as well as other recreational shelters. The 4-leg design gives the Nomad a smaller footprint than the Woodlanders, making it a good option for small spaces where a fireproof hearth area is used to reduce required clearances.

(Features/Specs)

  • Precision-crafted in 304 Stainless Steel that will never rust or corrode (1/8” thick cooktop material, 1/16” thick body material)
  • Includes 1 stove body, 5 sections of straight chimney pipe (2.5” diameter, 14” length), 1 spark arrestor, and 1 ash scraper
  • Weight: 20 pounds
  • Packed Dimensions/Stove Body Dimensions: 15” x 8” x 8”
  • Assemble Dimensions: 15” x 20” x 90” (90” indicates total height from the ground to the spark arrestor)
  • Footprint Dimensions: 16” x 13.5”
  • Firebox Capacity: Approx. 800 cubic inches (15” stove body depth nicely accommodates split wood)
  • Fuel Type: dry, seasoned wood only (not intended for coal burning)
  • Door features an air-control damper and a glass window for fire management and ambiance
  • Level side shelves lend cooking versatility and double as a carry handle
  • Highly portable- Nesting legs and shelves fold flat to the stove body; 5 pipe sections, spark arrestor, and an ash scraper stow inside the stove body
  • Wide 4-leg design helps keep the stove stable on uneven surfaces
  • Compatible with Medium Size and 2.5” Winnerwell Stove Accessories
  • Certifications: N/A (This is a recreational wood burning stove not intended for residential use)

Materials: Made entirely from 304 stainless steel, using 1/8” thick material for the cooktop and 1/16” thick material for the body, Winnerwell stoves are unique in the world of portable wood burning stoves. Good quality stainless steel lends several distinct advantages: It does not rust or corrode—a huge advantage in harsh outdoor environments; It can functionally withstand higher temperatures than mild steel, allowing thinner material to be used on the stove body which significantly reduces weight, ultimately making the stove more portable; And lastly, after the first burn, the stainless steel starts to take on a very nice patina color.

Operating Tips: Efficient and proper use of a wood stove requires some patience and practice. When starting your fire, it’s important to quickly establish a hot bed of coals to initiate a strong draw of air through the stove and up the flue. Use a generous amount of small tinder when starting a fire in the stove, slowly adding larger pieces of wood. Always open the door slowly to prevent smoke spillage into your tent or shelter. Never start a fire using flammable accelerates such lighter fluid. We strongly recommend operating your stove outside for the first several burns to practice your fire starting technique and optimizing burn temperature and rate using the airflow controls. It’s important that your stove burns hot enough to efficiently combust the fuel- when the stove is burning efficiently, little to no visible smoke should be exiting the chimney pipe. If the chimney is belching thick visible smoke, this is an indication the stove is not burning efficiently. Also avoid overloading the stove with fuel as this can create excessive heat which can warp or damage the stove.  

Accessory Recommendations: For added cooking utility, we recommend the Medium Water Tank and the 2.5" Pipe Oven. The water tank is excellent for melting snow and ice for drinking water, and when the stove is burning efficiently the tank will boil water in minutes thanks to its location at the back of the cooktop and the base of the flue pipe where heat is concentrated. The 2.5” Pipe Oven is large enough to cook biscuits, cookies, baked potatoes, and more. Using a large skillet or dutch oven on the cooktop in conjunction with the Pipe Oven provides a very functional camp kitchen set up.

Installation Recommendations: Always maintain adequate clearances when using a wood stove in a tent or shelter. We recommend at least 18-inches between the stove and any combustible material. When using a non-combustible heat shield or fireproof hearth, clearances can be reduced by half. We strongly recommend the use of a Double Wall Pipe Section and a Flashing Kit where the flue exits the tent or shelter. Always ensure the flue exits through a fireproof stove jack and the combustible materials are kept clear of the stove or flue. Whenever possible, secure the legs of the stove using tent stakes, bolts, or other adequate anchors to prevent the stove from tipping over. This is especially critical in shelters prone to movement like a trailer or boat.

Warnings & Considerations: Never leave a wood stove burning unattended. The surface of Winnerwell Wood Stoves become extremely hot during use, always wear leather gloves and exercise caution when operating the wood stove. Careful supervision of children and pets is mandatory when operating the wood stove to prevent harm or injury. When children or pets are present, we strongly recommend the use of fence panels or a stove guard to prevent unintentional contact with the stove. Only burn clean, dry, seasoned firewood in Winnerwell Wood Stoves. Burning green wood can result in carbon monoxide which is hazardous to health as well as increase the build up of creosote in the flue pipe which can create the risk of chimney fire. Clean the flue regularly (approx. every 20 hours of burn time) to avoid excessive creosote build up which can inhibit airflow and create the risk of chimney fire. We recommend a Winnerwell Pipe Brush for cleaning the flue. User assumes responsibility for the safe use of this wood stove.

 

Customer Reviews

Based on 17 reviews
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(15)
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12%
(2)
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J
J.C.
Exceeds expectations

For the price of this stove, I was prepared for disappointment...but that never happened. There are limitations to any small stove, but within those, this thing makes me very happy.
I use my stove inside a 25' long RV trailer -- about 200 square feet and tall enough to stand up in throughout. I made an adapter to pass the double-wall adapter through an open window, and I set the stove on a low bench inside, with the flue passing out the window at a 45. It's not perfect but it beats freezing! The top of the flue is guyed back to the wall of the RV with two thin cables on turnbuckles -- this is mandatory when using the 45s otherwise the wind will spin and blow over the flue (only when the stove is off -- when it's on, the joints expand and are tight). The coldest I've used the stove in was low 20's with 8" of snow coming down, and I was giggling in shorts and a t-shirt inside. I fully expect (but have not tested) that this stove could maintain comfort into the low teens, and probably keep my rig quite livable down near zero.

The stove will run at a low temp, but that's fiddly to do. It's hard to keep it burning well when it's that cool (and also keep it hot enough to avoid creosote). A stove thermometer is very helpful for this. Mostly though, this stove likes to run wide-open. You can damp it down if you have good wood, but this weakens the draw and the stove will puff back if it's windy outside. I'd love to see a venturi flue cap to solve this. Note that "wide open" usually means about 30* of damping on the flue and the inlet damper fully closed. If you allow in more air than that, the stove will glow cherry surprisingly fast. Even without getting it cherry red, the stove walls do warp some -- to be expected (and acceptable) given how thin and light the construction is -- but if you keep it below cherry the warping is manageable and all the doors and latches operate without binding. Get it hotter though, and you may be in for trouble. I strongly recommend a stovetop thermometer (the version meant to go on the stove body, not the flue). Lay it on top beside the flue exit (magnetic ones won't stick to the SS).

My use is primarily space heating, but I boil water and have cooked on it, too. The fold-out side racks are very sturdy -- I don't hesitate to put a full 2Q pot on them -- and more useful than I expected, especially for drying socks!!! You can't see it in the online pics, but the pivots are designed so the racks are tilted slightly upwards so when you put a pot on them, they sag down to be level. Details like that are SO important!

The stove body is not airtight. This obviously includes the cooking opening, but there are also gaps in the welds which I think might help reduce warping. This is fine -- once you learn how to keep it drawing, smoke leaks aren't an issue -- but it means you can never really shut down the inlet airflow. That's why the flue damper is not optional. It can shut down the stove in a hurry. If you're running any outside section of the flue non-vertical, rain can come into the flue when the stove is off. Partially it blows into the spark arrestor but mostly it sticks to the outside of the (cold) flue pipe and then runs downhill from there, getting into the joints. It will either drip down inside the stove or drip out of the pivot for the flue damper; either way it ends up on the floor behind the stove.

The 15" length is simultaneously a relief and a frustration. Other small stoves on the market are cube-shaped and you have to saw down every piece of wood you feed them, since most wood you buy is bucked to 16". If you're lucky it's a bit short but if you're unlucky it's a bit long. Because the door of the Nomad is full-width, if you split your logs down small - like less than a baseball bat in girth -- you can load them diagonally into the firebox -- but it's close. I generally end up sawing about half my store-bought wood so it will fit. This is a major advantage of the Nomad over the Woodlander, which has a narrower front opening and can't really do this. Ideally, though, you want short thick logs for a slower burn that doesn't require constant attention. Long skinny splits burn fast, so you'll be filling the firebox every 20 minutes.

Cleaning the flue isn't as bad as I feared. The instructions say to clean something like every 20 hours...but I went probably a full 30-40 before taking it down last time, and buildup inside wasn't bad. That was burning some pretty low-quality (but dry and not sappy) pinyon pine. I think the thermometer is so important for this, so you get it hot enough and keep it hot enough to prevent buildup. The available cleaning brush is effective, but a bit tedious to use by hand -- I screwed a long hex female coupler into the bottom so I could chuck it into my drill : )

G
G.T.
Great stove

works great and

J
J.H.
Fit and Finish is Top Notch!

After reading some reviews concerning sharp edges, I fully expected to spend a couple hours with a file and emery cloth smoothing any sharp edges. I spent an hour feeling every single edge and weld on the stove, stove pipes and water tank; and I did not need to pick up my file or emery cloth once! Fit and finish on every inch of the stove and water tank was top notch!!! I used it for the first time yesterday in my Eskimo Fatfish 9416 ice shelter at 5 degrees F, and the stove kept us nice and warm. Having the ability to cook hot dogs and hot cocoa in the ice shelter was a game changer!

C
C.T.
Nomad-medium stove and water tank

This stove is well made and performed excellent. I use it to cook on. I am very pleased with the fit and finish of all of the components including the water tank.

C
C.T.
Nomad-medium stove and water tank

This stove is well made and performed excellent. I use it to cook on. I am very pleased with the fit and finish of all of the components including the water tank.